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EST. 1913
1751 Lower Water St.
Halifax, Nova Scotia

CABLE WHARF

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA

Connecting Canada & North America with Europe

Cable Wharf.jpeg

A black and white photo of the Cable Wharf area of downtown Halifax, taken from on board USAT General R.M. Blatchford. The photo was taken on October 29 or 30, 1950.

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Halifax Municipal Archives circa 1970

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Crewmen carefully storing cable in large cable tank.
Credit: MARITIME MUSEUM OF THE ATLANTIC, Bloomer Collection, M2009.48.88

This significant accomplishment was realized through transatlantic cabling which included a vital connection on the Halifax waterfront. The over 3,200-kilometre-long cable stretched across the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean reaching depths as much as 3.2 kilometers. The cable was made from an insulated copper conductor protected by a rope-like metal sheath, and was designed to carry “messages” in the form of signals which translated letters of every word into Morse Code. The transmitted message was then decoded by a telegraph operator in Halifax.

 

To mark the historical connection of the transatlantic cable with Murphy’s the Cable Wharf (Cable Wharf), Waterfront Development Corporation (now Develop Nova Scotia) and the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, launched the Cable Wharf interpretive walkway project. A series of 10 panels highlighting the stories of ships and crew that were part of the cabling era in the 1900s, were officially unveiled on May 17, 2011 at Cable Wharf.

Today the building is home to Ambassatours Gray Line (one of Canada’s premier sightseeing tour companies) as well as the brand new Cable Wharf Kitchen & Patio.

This investment will recapitalize the historic Cable Wharf and extend its life by 10 years. Improving this infrastructure will enhance public safety and enjoyment of the waterfront experience including the popular boardwalk, interpretation series, and views around the building.

Cable ships (known as the sea’s workhorses) were designed to lay and maintain cables. Crews often worked in treacherous weather conditions. The ships based at the wharf were Cyrus Field, Lord Kelvin, and Minia, which were part of the Titanic recovery effort.

Today the building is home to Nova Scotia based business Ambassatours/Murphy’s the Cable Wharf—a popular attraction for visitors and locals alike.

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Physicist, Inventor, Innovator​

This significant accomplishment was realized through transatlantic cabling which included a vital connection on the Halifax waterfront. The over 3,200-kilometre-long cable stretched across the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean reaching depths as much as 3.2 kilometers. The cable was made from an insulated copper conductor protected by a rope-like metal sheath, and was designed to carry “messages” in the form of signals which translated letters of every word into Morse Code. The transmitted message was then decoded by a telegraph operator in Halifax.

 

To mark the historical connection of the transatlantic cable with Murphy’s the Cable Wharf (Cable Wharf), Waterfront Development Corporation (now Develop Nova Scotia) and the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, launched the Cable Wharf interpretive walkway project. A series of 10 panels highlighting the stories of ships and crew that were part of the cabling era in the 1900s, were officially unveiled on May 17, 2011 at Cable Wharf.

Today the building is home to Ambassatours Gray Line (one of Canada’s premier sightseeing tour companies) as well as the brand new Cable Wharf Kitchen & Patio.

This investment will recapitalize the historic Cable Wharf and extend its life by 10 years. Improving this infrastructure will enhance public safety and enjoyment of the waterfront experience including the popular boardwalk, interpretation series, and views around the building.

Cable ships (known as the sea’s workhorses) were designed to lay and maintain cables. Crews often worked in treacherous weather conditions. The ships based at the wharf were Cyrus Field, Lord Kelvin, and Minia, which were part of the Titanic recovery effort.

Today the building is home to Nova Scotia based business Ambassatours/Murphy’s the Cable Wharf—a popular attraction for visitors and locals alike.

Kelvin.png

Cable Wharf...today

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Cable Wharf.jpeg
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